Monday, December 14, 2009

Importance & Vulnerability of Palila and Mamane as cultural resources

Check out our latest podcast featuring third-year law student Kauʻi Yamane. In this podcast, Kauʻi discusses the importance of the Palila (Hawaiian honeycreeper) and Mamane (a native plant) as cultural resources. In her podcast, Kauʻi talks about:
  • the philosophy and importance of the Palila and Mamane to cultural resources,
  • recovery plans, and
  • current management efforts,
  • .



We hope you will share your thoughts.

Monday, November 30, 2009

Traditional and customary Native Hawaiian rights - a podcast

Check out our latest podcast below by third-year law student Trisha Nishimoto. In this podcast, Ms. Nishimoto analyzes, "whether Hawaii law will permit native Hawaiian access and gathering rights to extend to the hunting of animals, such as goat and pigs, on private property." In this podcast, Trisha reviews relevant state statutes and case law. Also in the podcast, Nishimoto briefly discusses "the complicated and unanswered question of whether otherwise valid, traditional, and customary native Hawaiian rights become invalid because its method is modernized."

Feel free to share your thoughts below.

Tuesday, November 24, 2009

Celebrate Makahiki and Support Ka Huli Ao.


November 23, 2009

Aloha kakou!

Each year since time immemorial, Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians) await the arrival of Nā Huihui o Makali‘i, the constellation of stars also known as the Pleiades or the seven little sisters. When Makali‘i rises at sunset, it is most visible in the night sky. For Kanaka Maoli, this signifies the beginning of the Makahiki, a traditional celebration of the harvest and a time of personal rest and spiritual renewal. Makali‘i usually appears around November when the sun turns to the North, which brings warmth to the earth and supports the growth of plants and the spawning of fish. As the harvest is gathered, gifts are traditionally given as an expression of thanksgiving.

In celebration of Makahiki, the staff at Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law, at the William S. Richardson School of Law, gives thanks for the many blessings reaped in 2009. With your support, we have much to celebrate, including:

* Expanded program offerings, which served over 2,000 students and community members this year alone through classes, clinics, lectures, presentations, publications, and other outreach efforts.

* Five more law school graduates in May 2009, with a Pacific Asian Legal Studies Certificate Specialty in Native Hawaiian Law.

* A newly approved stand alone Certificate in Native Hawaiian Law, which will be available to law students graduating in May 2010.

* A partnership with Kamehameha Schools supporting four Post-Juris Doctorate Research Fellows each year for three years to enable scholarship, research, teaching and other related projects in Native Hawaiian law.

* The first University funded tenure track position dedicated to Ka Huli Ao!

Although we have much to be proud of, more work still needs to be done. To help with these and other Ka Huli Ao initiatives, you can make a tax deductible donation at: www.uhf.hawaii.edu/kahuliao. With your support, we look forward to continuing to draw the best from Maoli tradition in pursuit of scholarship, enlightenment, and justice for Kanaka Maoli and all of Hawai‘i’s people.

To show our appreciation for contributions of $150 or more, we will send you a 27 oz. Ka Huli Ao stainless steel water bottle. The bottle will be sent to the address you provide on the online gift form. If you would like it sent elsewhere, please note that in the comment section.

To mail your donation, please make checks payable to the “University of Hawai‘i Foundation” and indicate “Ka Huli Ao” on the memo line. Send your check to:

William S. Richardson School of Law
Attn: Ka Huli Ao
2515 Dole Street
Honolulu, HI 96822


Mahalo piha,

Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie
Assistant Professor & Director

Thursday, November 5, 2009

Thursday, October 29, 2009

Auwē in Naue The Future of Hawaiʻiʻs Burial Laws

Auwē in Naue!

Join us for our November, Maoli Thursday event. RSVP is necessary and can be sent to nhlawctr@hawaii.edu by 11/3/09. CLICK ON image to enlarge

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Hawaiʻi National Native American Law Students Association Moot Court Team


The new members of the William S. Richardson School of Lawʻs Native American Moot Court Team have been selected. This year proved to be another grueling process for tryout judges, Professors Melody MacKenzie, Williamson Chang (advisor), and Carl Christensen. Each year a good number of students tryout for the team. Selecting the new team members was no easy task as numerous law students tried-out and were quite good in their advocacy skills. Tryouts were conducted over the course of two days earlier this month.

Pictured. Back row: *Mark Kaetsu, Chasid Sapolu, *Max Kopper, *David Kopper, Uilisone Tuʻa, *Keani Alapa, Jesse Smith. Front row: Captain Kaʻupena Soon, Lahela Hite, *Jeannin Russo, *Malia Gibson, *Sherilyn Tavares, and Scott Shishido.

* denotes newly admitted team member.

Our team participates annually in the National Native American Law Students Association Moot Court Competition. This year the competition (in its 18th year) will be held in Vermillion, South Dakota, February 19-20, 2009. More information about the competition is available at www.usdnalsa.org.

Last year, the Richardson duo of Ann Otteman and Jesse Smith captured Second Place in last yearʻs overall category (Best Advocates) at the competition held in Boulder, Colorado. In the past five years Richardson teams have performed well in the competition. In the years 2007-2009, Richardson teams ascended to the final oral argument round of the competition. In 2005 and 2006, Richardson teams placed Second and Third respectively for Best Brief. (see the teamʻs track record below) Prior to these years, Richardson teams consistently performed well.

If you would like to help support the team financially, PLEASE CLICK HERE to make a tax-deductible online donation.


Year Award
1997 Best Oralist First Place
1998 Best Overall Team Second Place
1998 Best Brief Third Place
1999 Best Overall Team First Place
1999 Best Overall Team Third Place
1999 Best Brief Second Place
1999 Best Brief Third Place
1999 Best Oralist Third Place
2000 Best Overall Team First Place
2001 Best Overall Team First Place
2003 Best Oralist Second Place
2005 Best Brief Second Place
2006 Best Brief Third Place
2007 Best Advocates First Place (formerly known as Best Overall)
2007 Best Oralist Second Place
2008 Best Brief First Place
2008 Best Oralist First Place
2008 Best Advocates Third Place
2008 Best Advocates Second Place
2009 Best Advocates Second Place

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

KGMB 9 and Native Hawaiians in law school.

Amy Kalili a 2006 graduate of the William S. Richardson School of Law is a Hawaiian-language news special correspondent for KGMB9ʻs, Sunrise on KGMB 9ʻs ʻĀhaʻi ʻŌleo Ola segment of the morning news. In the video below, Amy Kalili is at the William S. Richardson School of Law discussing ʻAhahui o Hawaiʻi, the Native Hawaiian law student organization and Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law.



CLICK HERE to check out Sunrise on KGMB 9.

Thursday, October 1, 2009

October Maoli Thursday

Live Today at 12:45pm.
The "Ceded" Lands Dispute: what does blood quantum have to do with it?


Free video chat by Ustream

Thursday, September 24, 2009

What does blood quantum have to do with the "ceded" lands dispute?

(Click on image to enlarge)




Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law presents: Maoli Thursday.

This month, our panel discussion is called, The "Ceded" Lands Dispute: What does blood quantum have to do with it?

Please see image above.

Seating is limited. RSVP by 9/27/09 at nhlawctr@hawaii.edu
If youʻre on MaoliWorld.com you can also RSVP by CLICKING HERE and select "Will attend". If youʻre on Facebook, after logging on, you can RSVP by CLICKING HERE and select "Attending."

What: Maoli Thursday, a monthly series of panel discussions relevant to the Hawaiian community. This monthʻs focus is the so-called "ceded" lands dispute and blood quantum.

Where: William S. Richardson School of Law 2515 Dole Street, Classroom 1

When: Thursday, October 1, 2009 at 12:45.

Who: Free and open to the public while the panelists include Dr. Jon Osorio and attorneys Naiwi Wurdeman and Yuklin Aluli.

Inquiries can be sent to nhlawctr@hawaii.edu

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

LSAT Prep class updates

Aloha mai kakou,

We just got confirmation on dates for our LSAT Preparation program from our LSAT prep instructor.

Although the application deadline is 9/24, a good number of people have expressed interest in finding out what the dates are so that they can plan accordingly. Please see the dates and times below. The classes are held at the Richardson School of Law. If you have any questions, please submit those questions to nhlawctr@hawaii.edu If you have not yet subscribed to our LSAT Prep Program e-mail list, can you do so by going to http://groups.google.com/group/lsatprepinfo-list?hl=en&pli=1 or http://bit.ly/LSATinfo.


LSAT DATES

6-9PM Wednesday, October 7: Class

6-9PM Wednesday, October 14: Class

9-12AM Saturday, October 17: Workshop

6-9PM Wednesday, October 21: Class

9-12:45PM Saturday, October 24: Test

6-9PM Wednesday, October 28: Class

6-9PM Wednesday, November 4: Class

9-12:45PM Saturday, November 7: Test

6-9PM Wednesday, November 11: Class

6-9PM Wednesday, November 18: Class

9-12:45PM Saturday, November 21: Test

6-9PM Wednesday, November 25: Class

9-12AM Saturday, November 28



December 5: ACTUAL TEST - Be sure to register with www.LSAC.org

Tuesday, September 8, 2009

Preparing students for law school.

Aloha mai kakou,

Weʻre finishing up our summer group for our Law School Admission Test (LSAT) Preparation class. Weʻre looking towards having another class in preparation of the December 2009 LSAT so that interested applicants can prepare for the 2010 application process.

Please visit our google group online at http://bit.ly/LSATinfo to download an application. Applications should be submitted by 9/24/09 as a hard copy only. More details to follow. We encourage interested applicants to follow up on our blog at www.KaHuliAo.com and by joining our e-mail list at http://bit.ly/LSATinfo.

Our LSAT Preparation classes are for aspiring law school applicants who have a demonstrated interest in:

  • Native Hawaiian Rights,

  • Native Hawaiian Law, or

  • Improving the conditions of Native Hawaiians.


Questions can be e-mailed to nhlawctr@hawaii.edu.

Monday, September 7, 2009

Maoli Thursday Video: True Sovereignty? The Akaka Bill and Its Implications

On Thursday, September 3, 2009, Ka Huli Ao held its first Maoli Thursday event of the 2009-10 academic year. The topic was the Akaka Bill also known as the Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization Act. Below is a video of three panelists discussing the Akaka Bill: Dr. Lynette Cruz, Robin Danner, Esther Kiaʻāina. (click here for bios on panelist).

Thursday, August 20, 2009

New Post-JD Fellowships

Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law is proud to announce its award of four new Post-J.D. Research Fellowships to support research, scholarship, teaching and/or other research-related projects in Native Hawaiian law. With a recent gift of $750,000 spread over the next three years from Kamehameha Schools, four recent law graduates will undertake advanced research to deepen knowledge and understanding of the legal issues facing the Hawaiian community.

Inaugural Research Fellows are Li‘ulā Nakama, 2009 graduate of the William S. Richardson School of Law; Nāpali Souza, 2009 graduate of the William S. Richardson School of Law; Breann Swann, 2004 graduate of the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, who also is a 2009 LL.M. candidate in Tribal Policy, Law and Government from The Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University; and Titiimaea Ta‘ase, 2008 graduate of the William S. Richardson School of Law.

CLICK HERE to read the full press-release.

Thursday, August 13, 2009

Pre Pro Bono Law School Admissions Test Workshop?

IMPORTANT! Before you read about the program below, it is necessary for us to provide a DISCLAIMER. The program described below is sponsored by a separate and independent non-profit organization not affiliated with the William S. Richardson School of Law. The organizationʻs classes will be conducted at the the law school. As a result, all questions should be directed to the sponsoring organization and not the law school.


PREPROBONO LSAT WORKSHOP

preprobono.org


Brought to you by Prime Produce (a NYC 501(c)(3) non-profit) and hosted at The University of Hawai'i School of Law, PreProBono is providing a special program for prelaw students in Honolulu.

Location: The University of Hawai'i School of Law (Seminar Room 6); 2515 Dole Street
Date: August 17 - 21 (Monday – Friday: 6pm – 10pm), 2009

Cost: $45 (scholarship recipients); $95 (financial aid recipients); $295 (non-scholarship or non-financial aid recipients). Note: our current scholarship acceptance rate exceeds 85%. Our financial aid acceptance rate has been and will remain at 100%. For more information, please read everything on this page.

Content: The 5 Full Day Workshop Includes:

  • 100% Comprehensive LSAT Preparation

  • Saturday Dinner and Q&A with Speaker (TBA)

  • PreProBono Prelaw Social Mixer and Alumni Network

  • Post Program Law School Application Assistance


Class: Class will run from 6pm – 10pm each day. The five day session covers the underlying theory of the LSAT and provides a comprehensive breakdown of each LSAT section and the attendant skills students need to master them. The student mixer, dinner and guest speaker event will take place following Friday’s class.

Instructor: The PreProBono instructor for these sessions is currently attending Harvard Law School. He scored in the 99th percentile on the LSAT and is an ex-instructor for TestMasters, a leading nation-wide LSAT test prep company. He has over 2 years of experience teaching over 350 students. We’re not kidding around here, this is a severely discounted top quality LSAT prep course. Hear what past participants have to say about our program.

Not for Profit: 100% of the proceeds you donate to Prime Produce will be either donated to Prime Produce designated NPOs or to cover the operating costs of Prime Produce programming (like this one). For example, on January 5th of this year, Prime Produce funded the construction of a new playground for an orphanage run by the Nepalese Youth Opportunity Foundation. The instructor, the speaker and all organizers are volunteering their time!

SPACE IS LIMITED!
For more info or to reserve a space, please visit www.preprobono.org. Under “When/Where” click on Honolulu, HI.

PreProBono is a program run through Prime Produce, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit whose mission is to entice creative and entrepreneurial scholars into the nonprofit sector.

Thursday, June 18, 2009

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS!!!!


CLICK HERE
to see actual announcement








Ka Huli Ao
Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian
Law
Post-J.D. Research Fellowships in
Native Hawaiian Law

Ka Huli Ao Post-J.D. Research Fellowship Program in Native Hawaiian Law provides stipends to recent law graduates to support research, scholarship, teaching, and/or other research-related projects that impact Native Hawaiian Law or that fill a need in the Native Hawaiian community. The goal of the Research Fellowship is to advance knowledge, scholarship, or learning in Native Hawaiian Law.

Depending on available funding, up to six Research Fellowships will be awarded. Fellows will receive a stipend of $50,000, paid out over a one-year period beginning in August 2009.

For more details on eligibility and requirements CLICK HERE



Monday, June 15, 2009

Featuring Bill Meheula

Bill Meheula is a Honolulu attorney who grew up Mō‘ili‘ili and Kalihi Valley. Bill Meheula recently served as an attorney in the United States Supreme Court case, Hawaii v. Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Bill talks about the Obama administration and how that affects the future of the Native Hawaiian community and the "ceded" lands.



As part of our community outreach, for the past several weeks, we provided a series of video clips of law students (and a few lawyers) on our blog. These law students and lawyers shared their experiences either in law school or in the legal profession.

We invite you to watch these brief video clips and hear what these inspirational people had to say.

Tuesday, June 9, 2009

Federal Indian Law class offered.


Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law is offering Law 520G - Federal Indian Law. The course will be taught by Hawai'i attorney and Visiting Assistant Professor of Law, Carl Christensen.

The Federal Indian Law (Law 520G) course examines constitutional constraints on the federal government's recognition of native groups in relation to pending legal challenges to benefits for Native Hawaiians and reviews recent developments and possible future trends in federal Indian law affecting Native Hawaiians.

The class allows enrolled students an opportunity to learn a very complex and unique area of law and the relevance of federal Indian law to Hawai'i. Only a limited number of Hawai'i attorneys have experience in federal Indian law and Prof. Carl Christensen is one of the few.

A fundamental understanding of federal Indian law, largely through the Federal Indian Law course, has been attributed to the William S. Richardson School of Law's Native American Moot Court Team's success in the past several years. For three straight years in a row, Hawaiʻi's Native American Moot Court team reached the final round of the National Native American Law Students Associationʻs annual moot court competition. CLICK HERE to read about this yearʻs win.

In 2007, returning Native American Moot Court team members wrote a commentary, in the Honolulu Advertiser, on the Akaka Bill and federal Indian law. CLICK HERE to read commentary.

Monday, June 8, 2009

From Azusa, California to Manoa

Ann Kanoelehua Otteman a third year law student and a finalist in this year's National Native American Law Students Association's moot court competition talks about the need for Native Hawaiian attorneys and law students. Ann took Second Place with her partner Jesse Smith. CLICK HERE for Honolulu Advertiser article. Find out what Ann had to say in the video below.



As part of our community outreach, for the next several weeks, we are providing a series of video clips of law students (and a few lawyers) on our blog. These law students and lawyers share their experience either in law school or in the legal profession.

We invite you to watch these brief video clips and hear what these inspirational people have to say.

Thursday, June 4, 2009

Our Very Own YWCA Honoree


The Young Womenʻs Christian Association (YWCA) has a website dedicated to women leaders at RaiseMyLeader.org One of this yearʻs honorees is Professor Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie. You can see Prof. MacKenzie RaiseMyLeader profile page by CLICKING HERE. RaiseMyLeader.org described Prof. MacKenzie as having, "worked on Native Hawaiian legal issues for over thirty years. In her role at the Law School, she develops and teaches courses on Native Hawaiian law, writes and lectures extensively and is the chief editor of the Native Hawaiian Rights Handbook. Recently, her efforts lead to the approval of a new certificate program in Native Hawaiian Law at the Law School. She also counsels and mentors law students as part of her commitment to developing future leaders."


If you know Prof. MacKenzie in either a personal or professional capacity, we encourage you to consider leaving a comment for (or about) her by CLICKING HERE, reading some of the current comments, and then scrolling down until you see "Leave a comment." From there you can enter your name as well as the comment you would like to leave. Mahalo nui for your support.

Law School Admission Test Preparation begins

This Saturday, Ka Huli Ao will begin its Law School Admission Test preparation program. Previously, the program was completed operated by the law student organization, ʻAhahui o Hawaiʻi with support from the William S. Richardson School of Law and Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law. We are confident that Ka Huli Ao will build upon the success of ʻAhahui o Hawaiʻi.


Initially, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs funded the program through grants. Now, Ka Huli Ao funds the program through its funding. The adoption of this program by Ka Huli Ao will help to keep the program sustainable and permanent as student leaders enroll and graduate from the law school.

Derek Kauanoe, a Ka Huli Ao Post-JD fellow who oversees the program, and Liam Skilling who conducts the classes are both excited for the incoming class. Previously, Liam and Derek worked on this program when it was managed by ʻAhahui o Hawaiʻi.

We have a good number of aspiring advocates for the Native Hawaiian community. Program participants have interests in various issues that include:

  • foster care,
  • the environment,
  • culture,
  • language,
  • and traditional & customary rights.


Derek is excited to know that many of these program participants not only have an interest in these issues but have also been demonstrably active in the community.

We had an overwhelming response to our program this year. Unfortunately, we are unable to accommodate every applicant. We are exploring possibilities to offer another class this fall to prepare aspiring law school applicants for the December 2009 LSAT. Anyone interested should CLICK HERE and subscribe or join the e-mail. We use that e-mail list to provide program updates.

We will definitely keep you posted on updates regarding this group.

Monday, June 1, 2009

From rural Kaua'i, to law school, to Earth Justice, and back to law school


In March 2007, Prof. Kapua Sproat was featured on the cover of Hawai‘i Business Magazine as among 25 People for the Next 25 Years; Hawai‘i's Bright People and Bright Future. Watch the video below to find out where Prof. Kapua Sproat is from, what she does in the legal profession, and what she says Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law does.





As part of our community outreach, for the next several weeks, we are providing a series of video clips of law students (and a few lawyers) on our blog. These law students and lawyers share their experience either in law school or in the legal profession.

We invite you to watch these brief video clips and hear what these inspirational people have to say.

Monday, May 25, 2009

From the state legislature to law school

This week we're featuring a young Troy Andrade. Before coming to law school, Troy worked at the Hawai&$8216i legislature. Below, Troy describes his desire to learn about legal issues and the relevance of those issues to Native Hawaiians. He has suggestions for aspiring law school applicants. Find out what he says by watching the video below.



As part of our community outreach, for the next several weeks, we are providing a series of video clips of law students (and a few lawyers) on our blog. These law students and lawyers share their experience either in law school or in the legal profession.

We invite you to watch these brief video clips and hear what these inspirational people have to say.

Monday, May 18, 2009

Lahela Hite. Are Native Hawaiians under-represented at the law school?

Are native Hawaiians under-represented in the legal community? Find out what Native Hawaiian law student Lahela Hite says about that in the video below. Lahela is involved with the ‘Ahahui o Hawai‘i at the law school in addition to the school's award-winning Native American Moot Court team.



As part of our community outreach, for the next several weeks, we are providing a series of video clips of law students (and a few lawyers) on our blog. These law students and lawyers share their experience either in law school or in the legal profession.

We invite you to watch these brief video clips and hear what these inspirational people have to say.

Monday, May 11, 2009

From ethnic studies to law school, a discussion with Li'ula Nakama

Li‘ula Nakama sat down with us and shared what influenced her decision to come to law school and the value of a legal education. Watch the video below to see what she had to say.



As part of our community outreach, for the next several weeks, we are providing a series of video clips of law students (and a few lawyers) on our blog. These law students and lawyers share their experience either in law school or in the legal profession.

We invite you to watch these brief video clips and hear what these inspirational people have to say.

Monday, May 4, 2009

Another practicing attorney featured

Moses Kalei Nahonoapi‘ilani Haia III is a graduate of the William S. Richardson School of Law and a staff attorney with the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation. In 2007, the Honolulu Star-Bulletin recognized Moses as among "10 Who Made A Difference." CLICK HERE to read the article.

Find out what Moses Haia says about the future of Native Hawaiian culture and the law by watching the video below.



As part of our community outreach, for the next several weeks, we are providing a series of video clips of law students (and a few lawyers) on our blog. These law students and lawyers share their experience either in law school or in the legal profession.

We invite you to watch these brief video clips and hear what these inspirational people have to say.

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Supreme Court "Ceded" lands case decision

Third year law student, Nick Lee organized a panel to discuss the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in State of Hawai‘i v. Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The event is sponsored by ‘Ahahui o Hawai‘i.The panelist are: OHA Trustee (and former Judge) Boyd Mossman, attorney Bill Meheula and attorney and law professor Jon Van Dyke.

The panel discussion is today at approximately 12:45pm

Monday, April 27, 2009

3rd year law students featured today.

Nāpali Souza is from Kailua, O‘ahu and currently lives in Palolo. In the video clip below, Nāpali briefly talks about empowering the Native Hawaiian community through legal education. Find out what he says by watching the video.



As part of our community outreach, for the next several weeks, we are providing a series of video clips of law students (and a few lawyers) on our blog. These law students and lawyers share their experience either in law school or in the legal profession.

We invite you to watch these brief video clips and hear what these inspirational people have to say.

Friday, April 24, 2009

Additional information on Ka Huli Ao

This post is to complement (not compliment) an article written in the May edition of Ho‘oulu Lāhui Aloha.

The Director of Ka Huli Ao is Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie. CLICK HERE for Prof. MacKenzie's bio.

Other faculty members include:

Post Juris-Doctorate Fellows are:

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Law School Admission Test Preparation Program

Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law, (and a soon-to-be-named co-sponsor) is offering Law School Admission Test (LSAT) Preparation classes for aspiring law school applicants who have a demonstrated interest in:

  • Native Hawaiian Rights,

  • Native Hawaiian Law, or

  • Improving the conditions of Native Hawaiians.


Click here for an application. Applications are DUE on Friday, May 15, 2009. This means that applications should be postmarked no later than Thursday, May 14, 2009. Applications can be mailed to:

          William S. Richardson School of Law
          Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law
          ATTN: LSAT Prep Program
          2515 Dole Street, Suite 207
          Honolulu, HI 96822

Part of the application process requires an LSAT diagnostic test. The LSAT diagnostic test is scheduled for Saturday, May 16, 2009, at the the William S. Richardson School of Law, 2515 Dole Street in Classroom 1. The diagnostic test will begin at 9am.

This summer's classes will prepare accepted applicants for the September 26, 2009, actual Law School Admission Test administered by the Law School Admission Council. Specific LSAT Preparation class dates will be provided at a later time. Generally, classes are on Monday evenings for one class group, Tuesday evenings for a different class group, and on Saturdays. Evening classes are from 6pm until 9pm. Saturday classes are from 9am until 12 noon. There is a nominal program fee; more information about the fee can be found at http://tr.im/HUILSATfee

Questions can be sent to nhlawctr@hawaii.edu In the subject heading type the following: "ATTN: Community Outreach - LSAT Prep"

Monday, April 20, 2009

Center for Island Climate Adaptation and Policy - Presentation

The Center for Island Climate Adaptation and Policy at the William S. Richardson School of Law Presents:

Helping Vulnerable Communities Adapt to Climate Change

Featuring Maxine Burkett RECORDED LIVE!




The video quality improves when Prof. Burkett speaks, but generally the lighting is dim because of the power point presentations.

Malia from Maui

This week we feature, Malia Gibson from the island of Maui. Malia graduated with a Bachelor's Degree in Hawaiian Studies from the Kamakakūolani Center for Hawaiian Studies. Malia worked at the Hawai‘i legislature for a while and later applied to and enrolled in law school. Watch the video below to hear what Malia's manaāo is on going to law school and what she recommends to potential law school applicants.



As part of our community outreach, for the next several weeks, we are providing a series of video clips of law students (and a few lawyers) on our blog. These law students and lawyers share their experience either in law school or in the legal profession.

We invite you to watch these brief video clips and hear what these inspirational people have to say.

Monday, April 13, 2009

From Hawai'i island.

This week, we're featuring someone from Kā‘ū. The last name will definitely sound familiar to many. At any rate, check out the video below to find out what this country boy has to say and what he wants to be for his community.




As part of our community outreach, for the next several weeks, we are providing a series of video clips of law students (and a few lawyers) on our blog. These law students and lawyers share their experience either in law school or in the legal profession.

We invite you to watch these brief video clips and hear what these inspirational people have to say.

Friday, April 10, 2009

Climate Adaptation & Policy


The Center for Island Climate Adaptation and Policy at the William S. Richardson School of Law Presents:

Helping Vulnerable Communities Adapt to Climate Change

Featuring

MAXINE BURKETT
Director and Associate Professor of Law

Monday, April 20, 2009, 5:30 p.m.

Reception Immediately Following

Law School, Classroom 2
2515 Dole Street


Maxine Burkett is an Associate Professor of Law at the Law School and serves as the inaugural Director of the Center for Island Climate Adaptation and Policy (ICAP). Professor Burkett attended Williams College and Exeter College, Oxford University, and received her law degree from Boalt Hall School of Law at the University of California, Berkeley. Professor Burkett’s courses include Torts, Climate Change Law and Policy, Environmental Law, Race and American Law, and International Development. She has written in the area of Race, Reparations, and Environmental Justice. Currently, her work focuses on “Climate Justice,” writing on the disparate impact of climate change on poor and of-color communities and the United States’ ethical and legal obligation to these communities nationally and internationally. She has presented her research on Climate Justice throughout the United States, West Africa, and the Caribbean. As the Director of ICAP, she leads projects to address climate change law, policy, and planning for island communities in Hawai‘i, the Pacific region, and beyond.

The Center for Island Climate Adaptation and Policy facilitates a sustainable, climate-conscious future for Hawai‘i, the Pacific, and global island communities through innovative research and real-world solutions to island decision-makers in the public and private sectors. ICAP is an interdisciplinary program among the Law School’s Environmental Law Program, Sea Grant, the College of Social Sciences, the Hawai‘inuiakea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, and the School of Ocean and Earth Sciences and Technology. This lecture is co-sponsored by the Law School’s Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law, the Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies and the Department of Urban and Regional Planning.

Unable to attend the event? Ka Huli Ao expects to live-stream the event here on our website.

Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Ann and Jesse share their thoughts on Fed Bar


Ann Otteman, "The Fed Bar conference on Federal Indian law was an amazing experience that I would encourage all students interested in indigenous rights to attend. Judges, attorneys and fellow law students all gathered to discuss the important impacts of Federal law and courts on the nation's indigenous populations. One of the most interesting things that I learned was that the eyes of the nations are on Hawaii as a model for native rights. It was a great experience I plan on repeating."

Jesse Smith, "The 2009 Fed Bar Conference and NALSA meeting provided our team members the opportunity to experience first hand and learn about the important issues facing Indian Country today. We were able to network with and make friends with other advocates in the field and those most affected by changes in the law. Unlike any other field of law, attending such a conference as Fed Bar entails the law coming to life right before your eyes as you are thrown into the sea of humanity for which the law is supposed to serve. If nothing else, such an experience teaches us that the law is much more than what is written in codes and case books, and that even here in Hawaii we have friends across the country who empathize with and support our cause."

After the conference ended, the Hawai'i group went to Santa Fe town where this photo was taken.


Also after the conference ended, the Hawai'i group shared a meal with a Navajo lawyer and a Washington D.C. attorney.

Tuesday, April 7, 2009

Chasid and Ka'upenaikaika talk about the Fed Bar Conference



Second year law students, Chasid Sapolu and Ka‘upena Soon shared their thoughts regarding their experience at the Federal Bar Association's 34th Annual Indian Law Conference.



Chasid Sapolu
, "The 2009 Fed Bar conference was a one-of-a-kind opportunity to meet and interact with numerous individuals from the Indian law community and to recognize the actual expanse of this community throughout the many regions of this country. As attendees, we were exposed to the significant issues that are currently at the front of this community’s focus. We also met some of the current and future leaders in this community, and discussed the issues that Native Hawaiians were experiencing here in Hawai‘i. Overall, my experience at this year's Bar conference was amazing, I would definitely recommend any individual who is interested in Native issues to attend in the coming years."

Ka‘upena Soon, "The Fed Bar conference was really enjoyable. I got a chance to meet a lot of people involved with Native American law. Attending the plenary sessions were pretty informative. The gaming issues were particularly interesting, especially since the Salazar decision just came out and we were able to hear various viewpoints on the case. The conference provides an environment that helps law students, professors, and attorneys who share similar viewpoints to discuss hot legal topics makes for a great networking event. I would definitely recommend attending this event in the future. It provides a good opportunity to really get to know a lot of people in Federal Indian law. The feel is completely different from moot court, in that you can really enjoy yourself and enjoy others."

After the conference ended, the Hawai‘i visitors went to Santa Fe town, 2-3 blocks from their motel rooms.

Five law students and 1 alumnus go on a voyage

For the first time in more than three decades, the Federal Bar Association (“FBA”) held its annual Indian law conference on an Indian reservation this year at the Buffalo Thunder on the Pojoaque Pueblo Reservation in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Concurrent with this conference was the National Native American Law Students Association’s annual meeting. Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law made it possible for five William S. Richardson School of Law students to attend the conference and meeting. You can read an on the spot blog of the conference by CLICKING HERE.

The five law students are: Ann Otteman (3L), Chris Santos (3L), Chasid Sapolu (2L), Jesse Smith (2L), and Ka’upenaikaika Soon (2L). These students are members of the 2008-09 WSRSL Native American Moot Court team and were accompanied by, Ka Huli Ao Post-JD Fellow and 2008 WSRSL alumnus, Derek Kauanoe.


From L to R, Ann Otteman, Chris Santos, Chasid Sapolu, Jesse Smith, and Ka‘upenaikaika Soon, and Derek Kauanoe pose here for a photo during the Thursday luncheon between conference sessions


The conference and meeting proved to be both an informative event covering issues in “Indian country” as well as an outstanding networking opportunity. The five students were introduced to a number of key people who also recognized their strong and impressive advocacy skills through moot court. A few of the people they met include:

Our Richardson students also met a number of other students from law schools across the United States. Some of these other law students include:
  • Naomi Bebo from the University of California Law Angeles School of Law,

  • Burton Warrington from the University of Kansas

  • Joshua Clause, incoming National Native American Law Students Association President, from the University of Michigan school of law

  • Marilyn Phelps, from UCLA,

  • Nicole Sieminski from UCLA,

  • Aurora Lehr a 3L from the University of Washington,

  • Nikki Borchardt a 3L from ASU,

  • Jeremiah Swett from Cornell University,

  • Jody Tallbear from Hamline University


The conference provided eight plenary sessions that covered: environmentalism on the reservation, tribal gaming, Supreme Court cases affecting Indian law, tribal economic development, renewable energy, genetically modified organism and food supplies. Hawaii issues and cases were briefly mentioned that included GMO kalo, Hawaii v. Office of Hawaiian Affairs, and Rice v. Cayetano.

Next year’s Federal Bar Association’s Indian Law Conference will be held April 7 - 9, 2010, at Buffalo Thunder. To find out what second year law students Chasid Sapolu and Ka‘upena Soon think about their time at the conference, go to http://tr.im/chaskau

Monday, April 6, 2009

No law student this week.

Unlike the past 3 weeks, we are not featuring a law student. This week, we are featuring practicing attorney and law professor Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie. Professor MacKenzie is also the Director of Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law and she was also in the first graduating class of the William S. Richardson School of Law. Prof. MacKenzie is also the chief editor of the Native Hawaiian Rights Handbook. Watch the video below to learn more about what Prof. MacKenzie has to say about law school and the legal profession.



As part of our community outreach, for the next several weeks, we are providing a series of video clips of law students (and a few lawyers) on our blog. These law students and lawyers share their experience either in law school or in the legal profession.

We invite you to watch these brief video clips and hear what these inspirational people have to say.

Thursday, April 2, 2009

Native Court in Hawai‘i

Today at 12:45 pm we will be live-streaming, "AN ALTER-NATIVE COURT FOR HAWAI‘I: Exploring the Needs and Possibilities." You can watch it on the video player below.


Ka Huli Ao Post-J.D. Fellow, Ka‘ano‘i Walk leads a discussion on the idea of a Native court in Hawai‘i. Is there a need for a Native Court? What jurisdiction could such a court have? How do Native courts operate in other settings? Ka‘ano‘i is joined in the discussion by T.J. Quan, a practicing attorney, currently working with the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation, who has also represented Native Hawaiians in both criminal and civil courts. Ka‘ano‘i is also joined Colin Kippen, a Native Hawaiian and a former tribal court judge for the Suquamish Tribe.

Monday, March 30, 2009

A law student who comes from Hilo

This week we are featuring Sherilyn Tavares from Hilo, Hawai‘i. Sherilyn tells us what high school she graduated from, why she decided to attend high school and provides some insight. Find out more about Sherilyn in our video below.



As part of our community outreach, for the next several weeks, we are providing a series of video clips of law students (and a few lawyers) on our blog. These law students and lawyers share their experience either in law school or in the legal profession.

We invite you to watch these brief video clips and hear what these inspirational people have to say.

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

The Sun v. Māui - an adventure with Bigs and Littles

Did you already forget what Bigs and Littles are? Or is this the first time you've heard of Bigs and Littles? If so, CLICK HERE to read what Bigs and Littles are.

On Saturday, March 21, 2009, Ka Huli Ao, the William S. Richardson School of Law, and Big Brothers Big Sisters of Honolulu hosted Waimānalo 5th, 6th, and 7th graders at the law school. The full partnership also includes Kamehameha Schools and the Honolulu Academy of Arts.

Below is a video to watch the Bigs and Littles during their mock trial of Kalā v. Māui. Kalā is the Sun. In Hawaiian folklore, Māui, a demi-god, slowed down the Sun from racing across the sky for the purpose of helping the people. One benefit of slowing the sun was that kapa could dry during the day. To read more about our mock trial version of the Sun (Kalā) and Māui, CLICK HERE. Below the video are a few photos.







After the mock trial, the Littles went on a tour of part of the University of Hawai‘i Mānoa campus. The last photo was taken at the NEW Frear Hall.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Hawai‘i Native Courts?

click to enlarge

Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law presents:

MAOLI THURSDAY
Thursday, April 2, 2009
12:45pm - 1:45 pm
Classroom 3
William S. Richardson School of Law
AN ALTER-NATIVE COURT FOR HAWAI‘I: Exploring The Needs and Possibilities

Ka Huli Ao Post-J.D. Fellow, Ka‘ano‘i Walk leads a discussion on the idea of a Native court in Hawai‘i. Is there a need for a Native Court? What jurisdiction could such a court have? How do Native courts operate in other settings? Ka‘ano‘i is joined in the discussion by T.J. Quan, a practicing attorney, currently working with the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation, who has also represented Native Hawaiians in both criminal and civil courts. Ka‘ano‘i is also joined Colin Kippen, a Native Hawaiian and a former tribal court judge for the Suquamish Tribe.

Monday, March 23, 2009

Nanakuli's own Sapolu

This week we're featuring Nānākuli's own Chasid Sapolu. Chasid graduated from Nānākuli High & Intermediate School. In the spring of Chasid's first year of law school, he was awarded the 2008 Patsy Mink Fellowship and spent the summer working in Washington D.C. Watch the video below to see what Chasid shares with us about law school.



As part of our community outreach, for the next several weeks, we are providing a series of video clips of law students (and a few lawyers) on our blog. These law students and lawyers share their experience either in law school or in the legal profession.

We invite you to watch these brief video clips and hear what these inspirational people have to say.

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Revisiting Asian-Pacific Law & Policy Journal Symposium


Pictured above (from L to R) Dr. Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Prof. Rebecca Tsosie, Prof. Kapua Sproat, Doris Tam (3L), Prof. Ani Mikaere, and Prof. Melody MacKenzie.


Ka Huli Ao, with the Asian-Pacific Law & Policy Journal, co-sponsored the INDIGENOUS WOMEN'S RIGHTS: Conflicts and Challenges for Today's Indigenous Women symposium on Thursday, March 12, 2009.

Video footage from the symposium is now available for viewing.

Part 1 of 4


Part 2 of 4


Part 3 of 4


Part 4 of 4

Monday, March 16, 2009

Weekly video series featuring Ashley Obrey.

This week, we're featuring third year law student Ashley Obrey, who speaks
about law school, why she chose to attend law school, and what she thinks people considering a legal education can do in preparation for law school.



As part of our community outreach, for the next several weeks, we are providing a series of video clips of law students (and a few lawyers) on our blog. These law students and lawyers share their experience either in law school or in the legal profession.

We invite you to watch these brief video clips and hear what these inspirational people have to say.

Sunday, March 15, 2009

Summer Law Clerk opportunity.

Anosh Yaqoob, a 2008 graduate of the William S. Richardson School of Law and multi-award winner at both the 2007 and 2008 National NALSA Moot Court Competition, spent the summer of 2007 working for a national law firm. Anosh worked in the Sacramento, California office of Fredericks Peebles & Morgan LLP. While he worked there, he described his experience as a great opportunity where he worked on interesting assignments. That firm, Fredericks Peebles & Morgan is now hiring summer law clerks for 2009. The language from the notice below comes from a pdf file we recently received and presents law students with a great opportunity to apply to work with a recognized firm.

FREDERICKS PEEBLES & MORGAN LLP

Attorneys at Law

2009 SUMMER LAW CLERKS


Fredericks Peebles & Morgan LLP (“FPM”) is a nationwide firm specializing in the practice of Federal Indian law. FPM represents Native American tribes and organizations in a wide spectrum of areas including business transactions, litigation and governmental affairs.

FPM is seeking applications for 2009 Summer Law Clerks in its Louisville, Colorado; Omaha, Nebraska; and Washington, D.C. offices. Applicants must be enrolled in an ABA accredited law school. Second or third year law students preferred. Strong interest in federal Indian law required. Experience working with Tribes or coursework in federal Indian law or related areas helpful. Applicants must also possess excellent analytical, research and communication skills, and the ability to work well independently and as a team in a fast paced environment. FPM offers a competitive stipend for a 10-week summer clerkship.

Please email your cover letter, resume, a writing sample and law school transcripts to:

  • Louisville, Colorado – Susan Tillman at stillman@ndnlaw.com;

  • Washington DC – Derril Jordan at djordan@ndnlaw.com; or

  • Omaha, Nebraska - Bonnie Cox at bcox@ndnlaw.com

For additional information about FPM, visit our website at www.ndnlaw.com.

Friday, March 13, 2009

Externship Opportunity with the Indian Land Tenure Foundation

Externship Opportunity with the Indian Land Tenure Foundation


The Indian Land Tenure Foundation (ILTF) is seeking a second year law student to serve as an extern for the summer of 2009. The externship is a full-time position over the course of 10 weeks (400 hours) beginning June 1, 2009. The extern will be primarily working out of northern Minnesota, near the White Earth and Leech Lake Reservations. This is a paid externship.
ILTF’s mission is to ensure that "land within the original boundaries of every reservation and other areas of high significance where tribes retain aboriginal interest are in Indian ownership and management." We support this mission by working with tribal land offices, legal service providers and Indian landowners throughout Indian Country. The areas of focus for the summer extern are:

  • Conduct Community Education and Outreach sessions.

  • Contact and meet with American Indian clients from the Leech Lake and White Earth Reservations who have requested assistance in preparing wills or other estate planning documents in compliance with the American Indian Probate Reform Act.

  • Research BIA and county records related to clients’ property interest.



  • The deadline for applications is April 27, 2009.

    Student applicants must demonstrate professional, as well as legal, communication and writing skills. Students must also have basic knowledge of estate planning; successful completion an introductory property, estate planning, or probate course is preferred. Background knowledge on Indian land history is not required, but a desire to understand the historic relations between tribes and governments is critical. Research, analysis and data collection experience is preferred. The applicant must be willing to live in northern Minnesota for the summer, to travel and interact in new or different environments socially and culturally. Please submit letter of interest and resume with references and recommendations to:

    Howard D. Valandra, Vice President Grants and Programs
    Indian Land Tenure Foundation
    151 East County Road B2
    Little Canada, MN 55117
    Office 651/766-8999
    Fax 651/766-0012
    hvalandra@indianlandtenure.org

Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Indigenous Women's Rights: Conflicts and Challenges for Today's Indigenous Women

The Asian-Pacific Law & Policy Journal, is hosting (with Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law co-sponsoring), "INDIGENOUS WOMEN'S RIGHTS: Conflicts and Challenges for Today's Indigenous Women"

You can view the symposium brochure by CLICKING HERE.

WHERE: William S. Richardson School of Law; 2515 Dole Street, Honolulu, HI Moot Court Room
WHEN: Thursday March 12, 2009 - 11:00 am - 5:30 pm

11:00 - 11:15 am
Opening Remarks
Refreshments

11:15 - 12:35
Keynote Speech: Professor Ani Mikaere
Director, Maori Laws and Philosophy
Te Wananga o Raukawa, Aotearoa/New Zealand

12:35 - 1:00 pm
LIGHT LUNCH

1:00 - 2:00 pm
Professor Rebecca Tsosie
Director, Indian Legal Program
Arizona State University

2:00 - 2:15 pm
Refreshments

2:15 - 3:15pm
Dr. Aileen Moreton-Robinson
ARC Post-Doctorate Research Fellow
Queensland University of Technology, Australia

3:15 - 3:30 pm
Refreshments

3:30 - 4:30 pm
Panel on Indigenous Women's Rights
Moderated by Professor D. Kapua Sproat,
University of Hawai‘i William S. Richardson School of Law

4:30 - 5:30 pm
Closing Remarks
Reception

Friday, March 6, 2009

For Third Consecutive Year, UH Places Among Top Teams

UH Law School Moot Court Team Again Finishes Among the Top Teams In National Competition


HONOLULU ­­­– Students from the University of Hawai`i’s William S. Richardson School of Law successfully defended their title and won second place again at the National Native American Law Students Association’s Moot Court Competition. More than 40 teams from 17 law schools across the United States competed. This marks the third year in a row that a University of Hawai`i Law School team competed in the final round.

“Once again our students worked very hard and did an outstanding job in this intense national competition,” said Avi Soifer, Dean of the Law School. “We are very proud of all these students and very grateful to all the members of the legal community who helped them prepare so well for the national competition.”

The 17th annual National Native American Law Students Association’s Moot Court Competition was hosted this year by the law schools at the University of Colorado and Denver University. Law students compete by arguing both sides of a simulated appeals court case both orally and in writing.

Third year law student Ann Otteman and second year law student Jesse Smith completed five oral argument rounds before reaching the final round. Otteman and Smith took second place in the Best Advocates category, while a team from Columbia Law School finished in First Place. This category represents the top team of competitors in the oral argument portion of the competition.

Other students who competed included third year law students Rafael Renteria, Christopher Santos, and Terrence Thornburgh, and second year law students Lahela Hite, Chasid Sapolu, Scott Shishido, Ka`upena Soon, and Kau`i Yamane. Six of these students also reached the top 16 team bracket. These Hawai'i law students were accompanied by Joni Domingues and Uilisone Tua.

Hawai`i judges, attorneys, and law professors helped to prepare Hawai`i’s teams. The judges included federal Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Richard Clifton, District Court Judges David Ezra and Michael Seabright, and Magistrate Judge Leslie Kobayashi.

The Honolulu Advertiser also had an article on this.

3 Lawyers share observations of Supreme Court ceded lands case




On Thursday, March 5, 2009, Ka Huli Ao hosted its monthly Maoli Thursday lunch-time event. This past Maoli Thursday was titled, "State v. OHA Oral Argument: What Really Happened at the U.S. Supreme Court?" Just like all other Maoli Thursdays, this too was FREE and OPEN to the public. A number of non-law school affiliated people were present. This event was also live-streamed over the internet by Ka Huli Ao.




The guest speakers were:


  • Sherry Broder

  • Melody MacKenzie

  • Richard Naiwi Wurdeman

You can find out what was said by watching the video.



Next month's Maoli Thursday is scheduled, for April 2, 2009 at 12:45. Subscribe to our e-mail list (to the right) and we'll be sure to keep you updated.

Richardson Law Students and Waimānalo Keiki

Ka Huli Ao, and the law school, have developed a working relationship with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Honolulu. The full partnership also includes Kamehameha Schools and the Honolulu Academy of Arts. We blogged about the early stages of the planning for this last November 13.



Law students serve as mentors to 6th, 7th and 8th graders from Waimānalo. Once a month, law students ("Bigs") meet with the Waimānalo keiki ("Littles") for some fun activities.


Law student mentors will meet with their young mentees in the spring of 2009 for a few hours each month. The program expects to provide a variety of activities that will foster a relationship between individual law students and elementary-intermediate school students.








Participating law students are: Aeri Yum, Amy Brinker, Barron Oda, Ha‗aheo Kaho‘ohalahala, Jennifer Humphries, Jennifer Lee, Jessica Domingo, Jessica Taba, Joni Domingues, Lianne Aoki, Mariah Carmichael, Page Kraker, Sari Sanchez, Sherilyn Tavares, and Stephen Wood.

We expect that both our Bigs and Littles will continue having fun as we move forward with this program. Mahalo to Big Brothers and Big Sisters for providing us with the photographs.